Sequels and the Past

I Think This Should Work

Recently fellow roguelike developer Josh Ge mentioned that I had been somewhat quiet when talking about Steam Marines 2 – and he had a point, at least on Twitter. I’ve more or less been getting into the swing of doing on-site testing so I can observe people playing super early builds of the game. I think it’s been enlightening.

But the observation’s not exactly correct, either – I’ve just switched up my strategy for keeping Steam Marines 2 alive and kicking at the back of skulls through a system of scheduled media across several sites and forums; I’ve just offloaded a lot of my groundswell marketing efforts off of Twitter.

Aside: Have you not heard of Josh’s game, Cogmind? You should totally check it out.

Cogmind gif
Cogmind!

Todo Lists and You

I used to keep rather detailed todo lists with high and low priority and “maybe” sublists and subtasks with estimates of time to completion in minutes. I don’t do that anymore.

Now my todo lists are split into simply high and low, I keep my high priority list capped at eight items max, and I estimate task completion in days. Additionally any high priority task that does not get completed within the time estimate gets kicked down to low priority.

I changed from high/low/maybe because maybe was just becoming a dumping ground for low priority tasks I wanted to clear out because of time crunch. I switched to estimating task completion in days because frankly estimating in minutes was pointlessly granular and I’m starting to believe that “large” task milestones per day is a better metric overall than time spent per day (in the sense of it is a more accurate indicator of progress.) Capping high priority tasks to eight is largely a method of preventing too many issues of becoming “high”.

When All Tasks Are High Priority

There are differing opinions on time tracking, although maybe not all that different!, although I maintain that keeping a mental model of what I want to do and what I should be angling toward is a net benefit to me. Your mileage may vary.

 

At Some Point You Have To Start Listening To Yourself

This is tricky because I spent the last two years writing part 1 and part 2 of this blog series explaining how I was a ding dong. It can be a bit unintuitive, but you sort of need to be humble enough to admit you don’t know a lot but also arrogant enough to trust yourself to make decisions because you will inevitably be faced with making judgement calls that are unclear and on topics people with more experience than you have disagree on.

And ultimately what matters is that it works for you, not them. In your situation, not theirs.

In all other cases, hypothesize, test, draw conclusions, and repeat. If it has demonstrably good results keep doing it.

Steam Marines 2 is a sequel. There don’t seem to be that many indie game studios that do sequels. It probably has to do with high failure rate.

But I want to make Steam Marines a franchise: a video game series, a board game, a trading card game, sell merchandise, and so on and so forth.

People have told me it’s a great idea, others tell me it’s a losing proposition. The divide seems to be between developers who believe in failing fast and those who don’t. Franchise building is hard and it takes a lot of time. Risky, say the fail fast crowd. They’re probably not wrong.

Still it’s a goal, and one I think I can achieve.

Aside: I rolled the idea of funding a games analysis/news site around in my head, but ultimately I couldn’t figure out a reliable business model. It really does seem to be a brutally difficult field to succeed in long term.

Motivation

Know what’s cool? Having hardcore fans of your game who still play it years post-release. That’s wild to me. Even wilder? Steam Marines 1 is still kind of in a long tail, selling copies regularly that keeps me fed. Its revenue in 2015 more or less paid for Steam Marines 2 development costs in the same time period.

Also gifs. Lots of gifs.

Steam Marines 1&2 Comparison
Steam Marines 1&2 Comparison

Bonus: This gif informed me that my marine hit animations were broken in the current build. Whoops.

Side projects keep things fresh, even when you’re 2 years into a 4 year project – when you’re in the grinder. I’ve been tinkering with old financial tools (non-game development related), watching some cool stuff on Netflix, and cannibalizing old games to make new ones like this:

Tilting Hard
Tilting Hard – Damn that hitch in the middle!

Twitter is pretty good for this, too. It’s real nice watching devs you know release their games. This blog is also a pretty okay place to rant if need be. I still haunt /r/GameDev now and then, although as the subscriber base grows the place does seem to get more hostile toward even the ideas of running a business and marketing. I also re-read certain articles and re-watch certain videos that are both enjoyable and educational. For example:

I also torment myself by reading news about the US election and Brexit, but that may be too masochistic for many.

538 Nowcast 2016
Fuck  Trump

 

Alpha Release

Steam Marines 2 is nearing its initial alpha release. Itch seems more or less ideal for me because I wanted to 1) narrow my pool of prospective players, and 2) iterate without the almost inevitable backlash that Steam Early Access is coupled with. I also wanted to test some theories I had on pricing, and that’s easier to do with fewer players.

I hope reception is good. I’ve worked on the game for a little over two years now, and that’s a lot of time and effort to spend on anything.

I’ve been trying to get better about working reasonable hours. That is, anywhere from 40-60 hours a week. Which is still a bit obscene, especially taking into consideration that in the US private sector the average hours worked per week is about 34.4. So I’m working on that. But I still don’t know any successful entrepreneurs who worked 40 hours or less a week during the first few years of their business launching. Worthless Bums LLC was formed in October 2011, so I guess maybe I’m a little behind the curve.

I track my hours worked, and I graphed it back in August this year:

Way Too Many Hours
Way Too Many Hours

Part of the problem is I don’t want to grow fast or leverage up. I have the funds, and I can raise more, but I’m having some personal issues with giving up control – namely of code and design. I don’t even like design but I find it hard to give up control.

Another is that I’m a workaholic. I’m always doing something. I can barely sit still for half an hour of television.

Despite (because of?) my ridiculous hours of work, my return on investment, per hour, is good. Unfortunately not as good as my passive investments over the same time period, but my investment portfolio outperforms the S&P 500 by a fairly wide margin; I’m not at all unhappy with my game development business as a business.

Versus S&P500
Versus S&P 500

I’m in a good place financially – I have no grounds for complaint. I can fund Steam Marines 2 development through 2018 without selling another copy of any game so that’s nice.

 

Acts of RNG

I did get tripped up a bit with contractors in 2016.

My character animator decided to take some time off to focus on his own game. This is cool, although the timing was not the best for me – you sort of have to expect this in multi-year projects, even if your contractors are not working on your stuff full time and/or at top priority.

Elasticity
My character artist, Ed’s, Game… Thing

My environment artist got chased out of his home by Hurricane Matthew. Oh dear.

I was a bonehead and because of a communication mixup I wasted a month thinking I was waiting on audio from my audio guy but he was actually waiting on me. The lesson here is don’t go too long without touching base. Depending on how dependable you and the other person is, I recommend touching base at least once every 2 weeks. That said I have a fairly hands off approach to my contractors.

Still, I’m going into 2017 fairly optimistic. Unless the Steam Marines 2 alpha explodes in my face. We’ll see.

 

Thanks for reading,
Mister Bums

You can contact me at [email protected]Twitter, or leave a comment below.